Author Archives: Mehiyar

About Mehiyar

Dr Mehiyar Kathem is a researcher at University College London (UCL). Mehiyar completed a PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) where he researched peacebuilding interventions and the formation of Iraq’s domestic NGO sector after the 2003 War. During this research, he looked at the gradual evolution of Iraq from totalitarian dictatorship through the country’s emerging domestic organisations. His research interests include statebuilding, civil society peacebuilding and the ways in which development, politics and money interact at a local level. In 2012 and 2013, Mehiyar conducted field research in Iraq for his PhD programme, spending a year meeting with and interviewing domestic NGO actors, political parties, government officials and international donors. Previously, Mehiyar worked on a number of grassroots programmes geared to build the capacity of civil society organisations and continues to advise international donors on the effective design and delivery of projects in Iraq. He tweets at @mehiyar

I write to not forget

I write to not forget. To not forget my experience in Iraq, to feel alive and human; to not  become desensitised from the generalised malaise and constant forgetting that so easily becomes a defense mechanism victims of conflict unconsciously employ.

I write to not forget

I write to not forget. To not forget my experience in Iraq, to feel alive and human; to not  become desensitised from the generalised malaise and constant forgetting that so easily becomes a defense mechanism victims of conflict unconsciously employ.

Why political reform is essential to peace in post-ISIS Iraq

After some fourteen years since the occupation and invasion of Iraq, a US – UK experiment in ‘liberal peacebuilding’ that fundamentally transformed the Middle East, little has changed for the wellbeing of ordinary Iraqi citizens. The quality and provision of

Why political reform is essential to peace in post-ISIS Iraq

After some fourteen years since the occupation and invasion of Iraq, a US – UK experiment in ‘liberal peacebuilding’ that fundamentally transformed the Middle East, little has changed for the wellbeing of ordinary Iraqi citizens. The quality and provision of

The ‘project’ in post 2003 Iraq

Ive been meaning to write several blogs and articles on the topic of project failure in post-2003 Iraq. This blog is one of several on the concept and practice of the ‘project’ which I think is a useful and effective

The ‘project’ in post 2003 Iraq

Ive been meaning to write several blogs and articles on the topic of project failure in post-2003 Iraq. This blog is one of several on the concept and practice of the ‘project’ which I think is a useful and effective

An email from Baghdad

I was reminded of the following email by a friend of mine who suggested I should post it here. It is an update sent to friends in August 2016 about the situation in Iraq as I saw and witnessed it

An email from Baghdad

I was reminded of the following email by a friend of mine who suggested I should post it here. It is an update sent to friends in August 2016 about the situation in Iraq as I saw and witnessed it

Who is fasting?

It would certainly not be an exaggeration to say that the month of Ramadhan, at least here in Baghdad, is holy only for the few. Wherever I go, from friends to family to those further away, I see more people

Who is fasting?

It would certainly not be an exaggeration to say that the month of Ramadhan, at least here in Baghdad, is holy only for the few. Wherever I go, from friends to family to those further away, I see more people

Why I voted Out

The character of debate in the UK has been appalling and full of disinformation –  its mediocrity has illuminated the dire state of British politics. The Vote In/ Vote Out debate has largely focused on two topics – namely ‘trade’

Why I voted Out

The character of debate in the UK has been appalling and full of disinformation –  its mediocrity has illuminated the dire state of British politics. The Vote In/ Vote Out debate has largely focused on two topics – namely ‘trade’

The troubling political economy of Iraq’s Shia Clerical Establishment

When the US invaded Iraq in 2003 it subsequently disbanded the country’s Army, dismantled its security infrastructure and instituted an extensive set of occupation policies that seemingly made it the main political, security and economic actor in the country. The

The troubling political economy of Iraq’s Shia Clerical Establishment

When the US invaded Iraq in 2003 it subsequently disbanded the country’s Army, dismantled its security infrastructure and instituted an extensive set of occupation policies that seemingly made it the main political, security and economic actor in the country. The